1. “for their account ottorly admired”

     Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton Are 2010’s Most Admired   Interesting that the invective of the web didn’t scootch these results more to the right.  The poll question was open-ended, so they didn’t push names to the pollees.  Here’s the masculine question:  “What man that you have heard or read about, living today in any part of the world, do you admire most? And who is your second choice?”  22% said Obama, next was GW Bush with 5%, and Bill Clinton with 4%.  One problem with the open-ended question is, it’s hard to think of names to admire.  I would have to scratch my head if stopped on the street and asked out of the blue to come up with one name in the news of a person I admire.  I hope I wouldn’t go to the politicians right away for inspiration, as most of the USA Today/Gallup polled persons did…  But who?  Celebrities and politicians are in the front of most minds today, it seems.  I’ve spent the time it takes to type this, thinking about it, and unfortunately can’t come up with the name of any man in the news that I admire.  That’s kind of sad.  Fortunately there are several dead people I hold in esteem.

  2. "so we may stand some chances of warming…"

    Science and politics.  I’m struck by how angry commenters pile on any article related to global warming or climate change.  Even the most innocuous article is followed with a stream of anti-science, anti-Soros (not sure why the obsession about him), anti-Democrat, and Al Gore cracks.  Why are these guys (mostly, but some women) so strongly driven to waste their time trolling around to attack the idea?  What’s really driving their wrath?  It’s as if they feel personally threatened by discussion of climate change, and are lashing back.  This story about Fox News issuing guidance that reporting must “refrain from asserting that the planet has warmed (or cooled) in any given period without IMMEDIATELY pointing out that such theories are based upon data that critics have called into question”  has typical commentary.  

  3. "The Good Doctor mulled it."
A UK anaesthetist published an article in the British Medical Journal about a subject of interest to all cyclists: is a lighter bicycle faster?  His painstaking study (here) of his commuting times over 1500 miles, written up rather amusingly in the “serious” style of a medical paper, gave a counterintuitive result: heavy bike got him to work as fast as the lighter bike.  However, the interesting comments (here) of his fellow doctor-cyclists, mostly written in the standard academic ostentatious style of serious collegial commentary, bring out other factors.  Temperature, for one.  The colder it is, the slower I go.  Is the air more dense?  Yes, but that effect is minor compared to the increased wind resistance due to the wider cross-section of the bundled-up rider.  The drag increases with the square of the speed, due to the cross sectional area.   It was 20 degrees this morning on my commute to work, with a wind, and I can assure you it dragged.

    "The Good Doctor mulled it."

    A UK anaesthetist published an article in the British Medical Journal about a subject of interest to all cyclists: is a lighter bicycle faster?  His painstaking study (here) of his commuting times over 1500 miles, written up rather amusingly in the “serious” style of a medical paper, gave a counterintuitive result: heavy bike got him to work as fast as the lighter bike.  However, the interesting comments (here) of his fellow doctor-cyclists, mostly written in the standard academic ostentatious style of serious collegial commentary, bring out other factors.  Temperature, for one.  The colder it is, the slower I go.  Is the air more dense?  Yes, but that effect is minor compared to the increased wind resistance due to the wider cross-section of the bundled-up rider.  The drag increases with the square of the speed, due to the cross sectional area.   It was 20 degrees this morning on my commute to work, with a wind, and I can assure you it dragged.

  4. "till the bombtomb of the warr”
Troy-Bilt “Horse” roto-tillers can turn up the darndest things.

    "till the bombtomb of the warr”

    Troy-Bilt “Horse” roto-tillers can turn up the darndest things.

  5.  ”piked forth desert roses in that mulligar scrub”

    These are oil paintings of the Mojave Desert that my parents have, by Martina Camphausen who lived at China Lake.  Her son Ray was a friend of my brother’s.  One of them is a view of the valley from B-Mountain.

  6. "a testament of the rocks from all the dead unto some the living"

    These petroglyphs on blackened limestone in Southern Namibia are typical of those left by the San people a thousand years ago, and are very different from those left by the Native Americans of the USA southwest.  The glyphs pecked into the rocks are almost never figurative: no Bighorn Sheep, no dancing humanoids, no sunbursts.  They are not even symmetric.  They’re rather random. It’s been suggested that they were produced in a drug-induced meditative state.  But they always say that. 

  7. "Arranked in their array"
Very Small Array published this map of USA where each state is labelled with the first GOOGLE autocomplete suggestion that popped up when the name of the state was typed in to the search window.  This is a fun game.  I see that googlers are a sports-and university-obsessed people.  This is an interesting use of a valuable tool to generate nearly useless information.

    "Arranked in their array"

    Very Small Array published this map of USA where each state is labelled with the first GOOGLE autocomplete suggestion that popped up when the name of the state was typed in to the search window.  This is a fun game.  I see that googlers are a sports-and university-obsessed people.  This is an interesting use of a valuable tool to generate nearly useless information.

  8. "be circumspicious and look before you leak" →

    Interesting article in PC World, “WikiLeaks Nearly Immune to Takedown”.  Well, the internets were developed by DARPA to stay up after a nuclear war, so this shouldn’t be a surprise.  This is much ado about nothing much.  However the leaker broke his vows and shall be punished.

  9. chemicalled after you taking a lifeness…
Quite a few media stories about NASA-funded research on a bacterium from Mono Lake that can use arsenic in place of phosphorus, even to the extent of incorporating it into DNA manufacture.  I was underwhelmed by this story, especially the potential links to exobiology.  There are a lot of extremophile bacteria who can do amazing metabolisms.  This seemed an overblown news blivet.  Professor Robert Shapiro interviewed at Salon.com confirms my suspicions.  After the breathless opening question “What does this mean for the discovery of life in our solar system or universe?” [UNIVERSE? please…]  he replies: “Not much…”

    chemicalled after you taking a lifeness…

    Quite a few media stories about NASA-funded research on a bacterium from Mono Lake that can use arsenic in place of phosphorus, even to the extent of incorporating it into DNA manufacture.  I was underwhelmed by this story, especially the potential links to exobiology.  There are a lot of extremophile bacteria who can do amazing metabolisms.  This seemed an overblown news blivet.  Professor Robert Shapiro interviewed at Salon.com confirms my suspicions.  After the breathless opening question “What does this mean for the discovery of life in our solar system or universe?” [UNIVERSE? please…]  he replies: “Not much…”

  10. "Accidental music providentially arranged"

    I was surprised to hear Jimi Hendrix Performing the Band song “Tears of Rage” during an NPR review of the new 4-CD set “West Coast Seattle Boy”.  From listening to the snippets on Amazon.com linked above, this isn’t a must-hear for me.  I’m not enough of a super-fan to want to hear these informal recordings (but I AM enough of a fan to have bought the Band’s box set, “A Musical History”, which includes a lot of out-takes.)